The Sonoran Desert, AZ (part 1)

2015

Last year in February I traveled to Albuquerque, and Las Cruces New Mexico. In my previous blogs, you heard about, The Sandia Tram, White Sands, the hot springs, Route 66, the largest pistachio in the world, and the quaint, tiny, ancient, lovely, Alamogordo Zoo. I was introduced to huevos rancheros and many other tasty fine foods. Almost everything comes with green sauce or red sauce or both, that’s called Christmas. I tried them all. My favorite, is the green.

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My life-long dear friend moved in November to NM and I was missing her something awful, along with those green chili’s she had introduced me to last year. There was only one thing to do, and that was to return to New Mexico for a visit.

End of February 2016

From Las Cruces, we took a wonderful all girl short road trip to Tucson Arizona.

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Here we are!

During this visit, I learned even more about the desert and its inhabitants. I had no idea how colorful a desert could be in the spring. I took it all in and enjoyed every moment.

We stopped in Dragoon, AZ on our way to Saguaro National Park and enjoyed, The Amerind Museum and Art Gallery. This museum was gorgeous and I would highly recommend a stop, if you’re ever in the area. The world-class private collection was immense and impressive. It holds Native American art and artifacts from the entire western hemisphere. We only spent a couple of hours but could have spent a whole day. Fascinating and fabulous!

I would have to say, my favorite experience had to be hanging out with the ginormous Saguaro Cactus.

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Whew! Didn’t see any.

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Our Ladies Trip

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Saguaro Cactus

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FUN FACTS ABOUT THE SAGUARO (suh –wahr-oh)

I’m awed by the breath-taking views. The history of the mountains, the wars fought, and the Native American people with all their wisdom and appreciation of our planet. I was surprised by the many blossoming plants, and all the animals large and small who have not only adapted, survived, but still thrive in the deserts.

I felt honored being able to stand among these multi-aged cacti and walk among the desert grounds where so many have stood before me. As I closed my eyes and breathed in the deep dry desert air, I wished these two-century old cacti could share their life stories.

This type of cactus only survives in Southern Arizona, South of the border in Old Mexico. and a scattering spill across the Colorado River into California.

Saguaro cacti can live to be 200 years old and are one of the largest anywhere.

With an amazing root/rod system it can store enough water during one rainy season to last four years without another drink.

They don’t grow any arms until they are at least 75 years old.

At 10 years old, they are about the size of an ostrich egg

21 years, can be as high as a draft tree

75 years, possibly twelve feet

200 years, fifty feet tall and can salute you with three or four dozen arms

White waxy flowers appear about a day and a half. The green fruits ripen and burst open to reveal a bright red edible juicy pulp/fruit.It has been eaten throughout history and made into many delicious dishes.

Some brave animals actually live within the walls of these cacti.

Woodpeckers create caves within the wall of the cactus. Once they vacate, smaller birds move in.

The Elf owl, no larger than a sparrow also makes its home in the Saguaro.

Thank you for visiting my blog today.

 

Next blog: Part 2

San Xavier Mission

Desert Animals-insects

More Cacti and Plants

 

 

 

 

 

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1 Comment

Filed under New Mexico, Tucson Arizona

One response to “The Sonoran Desert, AZ (part 1)

  1. Pingback: Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park | Writing Naturally

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